Empty supermarket shelves

Empty supermarket shelves have become a common sight in Australia over the past two years due to Covid and extreme weather events.

Something that was once rare is now an everyday experience.

Empty supermarket shelves
Empty supermarket shelves have become a common sight in Australia over the past two years.

When I visited Zimbabwe in 1990, people there used to joke about what would be in stock that week and what would be missing. That was before Zimbabwe went from being a food bowl to a basket case.

Today I couldn’t buy fresh green beans and snow peas were $8.50 for a small bag. Last week there were no tomatoes and toilet paper is still in short supply.

This article from the University of Melbourne explains it well. Supply chains have been severely disrupted for extended periods, exposing flaws in Australia’s highly centralised food distribution model.

As stated, food security is about more than the amount of food that we produce. It’s also about ensuring equitable access to nutritious food and ensuring the resilience of food supplies in the face of shocks and stresses.

Bundaberg is a food-producing region but most of our fresh produce goes out of town before it comes back on trucks.

The Bruce Highway was cut twice this year. Apparently McDonald’s chartered aircraft to deliver buns for their fast-food restaurants but what was being done to ensure adequate supplies of essential vegetables and medical stocks? Not very much.

I don’t want to see Australia become like a third-world nation where empty supermarket shelves are a symbol of decay, poverty and incompetence.

A traveller through the universe. Not everyone who wanders is lost.

Share

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: